Career information

Eastern Iowa Midwifery is not currently hiring.

However, if you are a midwife, birth assistant, or other qualified personnel who would like to be notified of future openings, please send an email to katie@easterniowamidwifery.com. Thank you for your interest!

Thinking about becoming a midwife?

We often receive calls or emails from women seeking more information on becoming a midwife. While we applaud these aspirations, unfortunately, between serving our clients and our families, we are unable to meet with everyone personally. Instead, we are offering this the following in the hopes that it may serve as a stepping stone for women seeking such information.

What are the different ways to become a midwife?

There are two basic types of midwives: nurse-midwives and direct-entry midwives.

Certified Nurse Midwives, generally speaking, have an undergraduate in nursing and a master's in midwifery. Many practice in hospitals or birth centers, but in Iowa, they are also the only midwives who can legally provide homebirth.

Direct-entry midwives, including Certified Professional Midwives, directly entered the practice of midwifery via apprenticeship training, not through the route of nursing. Certified Professional Midwives undergo apprenticeship training to earn the national certification (CPM). They are licensed in many states to provide homebirth, and studies have shown they provide safe and satisfying care. However, they are not licensed in Iowa and as such are not considered legal and cannot file for insurance reimbursement.

A client will not be penalized for choosing care with a Certified Professional or other direct-entry midwife, but her midwife could, although generally speaking, this is relatively rare. Some direct-entry midwives choose not to become licensed as CPMs and practice without the credential, either because their state does not recognize it or they do not feel it is necessary. This is a matter of personal choice and each midwife will have her reasons for seeking or not seeking a particular credential.

What schools did you attend or do you recommend?

I (Katie) went to the University of Iowa for my undergraduate degree. While I do not believe that nursing is the only route to midwifery, I believe my nursing training was valuable to me in the overview it gave me of the human body as well as healthcare systems. I was encouraged to value principles like the autonomy of clients and their right to informed consent (and refusal), as well as caring holistically for persons, their family, and their environment. I highly recommend nursing as a route for people who a) want to help people and b) want to find a job. There are literally hundreds of career options, and whether you have children, aging parents, or just want to better understand the healthcare you receive, I think it's valuable training. It's also a handy steppingstone to midwifery.

I attended Frontier Nursing University for my midwifery training. I highly recommend Frontier as its distance-based midwifery program is strongly rooted in good-quality healthcare evidence and has a strong focus on out-of-hospital birth. Eastern Iowa Midwifery is a direct result of the guidance I received from Frontier in performing market research, investigating the relevant laws, and writing a comprehensive business proposal for starting a practice from scratch. While no school is perfect and there are plenty of others out there, Frontier was a great match for me and is the program I know best, so the one I recommend. They also offer a variety of nurse practitioner programs.